DIY Textured Styling Backdrop

DIY Textured Styling Backdrop

We started off this backdrop styling series last week with a white wood option, and for our second surface, we're using a new set of supplies from The Home Depot Canada to create a textured backdrop using plaster.

With a beautiful textured surface that you can customize to your liking and the opportunity to play with a colour palette of your choosing, this backdrop is a nice alternative to a solid coloured background that still gives you the opportunity to infuse a signature colour into your content. The texture creates a subtle, natural effect that is perfect for flatlays or those coveted detail shots that help tell a story. 

Refining your brand style through outfit inspiration

Refining your brand style through outfit inspiration

Remember that post awhile back where I talked about the brand personality questions I ask my clients — the fun ones that help me build a brand profile and dive a little deeper into the style and story? I wanted to take that one step further today, because I’ve had some questions about what that actually looks like, and how you take an outfit photo, for example, and use that to learn something new about your brand.

It’s similar to the process I teach in The Visual Strategy Masterclass, using inspiration images to extrapolate tone words and details that you can then apply to the project at hand. And because I’m in the midst of taking my own brand through an audit and giving it a bit of a refresh, I thought I would take this opportunity to share a little bit behind the scenes of how I’m using these questions to work through this process.

In the spirit of full transparency, I’ve found this brand refresh particularly hard for a couple of reasons

DIY White Wood Backdrop

DIY White Wood Backdrop

When it comes to styling, there are a number of decisions that need to be made to bring a photo concept to life, and one of the most important details that need to to be determined right off the bat is what backdrop you’re going to use. Helping to tell your story and quite literally setting the stage for your shot, your backdrop choice should not only tie in with your overall brand style, but also tie in and complement your subject matter without competing with it too much.

If you create your own content (or even if you work closely with a team in order to do so), it’s not a bad idea to build a styling toolkit that includes some go-to backdrops along with your props, which means you’ll always have them at the ready and can ensure some consistency throughout your visual content.

Nectarine and Thyme Jam Cocktail

Nectarine and Thyme Jam Cocktail

I tend to think of myself as more of a summer cocktail gal, opting for light and fresh flavours whenever possible, and tending towards creations that aren’t too sweet and ideally include a note of floral or a hint of the bubbly. But when the temperatures drop, my palate shifts along with my craving for cozy fall sweaters, and I find myself drawn to new flavour combinations that mimic the changing fall colours and my desire for something a little on the spicier side.

So when I found myself in Kitten and the Bear a couple weeks ago with an array of delicious looking fall flavours in front of me, I decided that there was only one thing to do — challenge myself to craft a seasonal cocktail that would not only feel seasonally appropriate, but to tie in with our recent fall tablescape as our final detail, thus concluding this styling series.

Styling a Fall Tablescape with Pink and Gold Details

Styling a Fall Tablescape with Pink and Gold Details

It started with a folder of inspiration images on my desktop and a gravitation towards a fall-toned colour palette filled with dusty pink and golden details, and after taking it through my creative process and dissecting it a little bit, it started to take form as a tablescape design.

You could file “host dinner (or brunch) parties” alongside a few other adult activities that I wish were actually part of my reality, so maybe this can be considered a trial run of sorts? 

Exploring the Creative Process with a Fall Color Palette

Exploring the Creative Process with a Fall Color Palette

Back in September, when I started to settle back into my normal routine a little, I found myself starting to collect inspiration images that felt distinctly fall-like — though with a Studio Bicyclette angle, of course. It didn’t take long before I found myself with a desktop folder full of saved images and a board dedicated to this new direction, and I started to notice some patterns in what I had found myself attracted to — rich textures, warm hues with a prevalence of brassy golds, deep yellows and dusty pinks, a hint of darkness, and some shadow play that resulted in a moodiness that felt appropriate with the seasonal shift.

With no real outcome in mind for this collection of inspiration images (usually I put together moodboards with a specific project or client in mind), I realized that I had the opportunity here to turn this into something “just for fun” — which brings us here.

A Love Letter to Photography (Set Against the Sparkling Sea)

A Love Letter to Photography (Set Against the Sparkling Sea)

Though I've always had a deep appreciation for the power of visuals and their ability to tell stories and evoke emotion (this is essentially what I've built my business on, after all), I'm convinced that between our wedding and honeymoon travels and the resulting galleries of photos from each, my love for a good photo has grown that much more.

As I flip through the albums, starting to heart my favourites and curate our travel photos into a sequence that will capture the trip and help us share it with others or revisit the memories down the road, I'm struck by the power of an image to transport me right back to a specific moment and experience. 

There's a Crack in Everything, That's How the Light Gets In // Using Self Doubt to Our Advantage

There's a Crack in Everything, That's How the Light Gets In  // Using Self Doubt to Our Advantage

When we’re uncomfortable or insecure in our abilities or how we’re doing things, we tend to become defensive and begin to question our work at the slightest sign of judgement. We need to own what we know, what we believe in, what we stand for. Otherwise, when others question it — or even when we simply think others are questioning it — it turns the spotlight onto us and all of a sudden we’re not so sure about what we’re doing. All those inklings of self-doubt come to the surface.